Articles Posted in Title VII

On June 3, 2019, the United States Supreme Court released an important decision in the case Fort Bend County, Texas v. Davis (slip opinion available at: https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/18pdf/18-525_m6hn.pdf) regarding claims of employment discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”). This decision promises to have widespread impact for many cases of employment discrimination filed in federal court, as it reevaluates and clarifies the role and impact of filing a charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”). 

When an individual believes that they suffered employment discrimination in the workplace, federal law may provide a remedy. In such a case, when an individual seeks to vindicate their rights under federal employment discrimination law, Title VII requires that complainants first file what is known as a “charge” with the EEOC prior to pursuing a civil action in federal court. This procedure has been treated by many courts as a prerequisite to the federal court’s jurisdiction over the individual’s discrimination claim.

After the EEOC receives a charge of discrimination they notify the employer(s) named by the charging party and investigate the allegations. The EEOC’s goal is to evaluate the truth of the allegations, as well as to determine if the dispute can be resolved through informal means or, if that is not possible, whether the EEOC will bring a civil action on behalf of the charging party against the employer(s) in court. The EEOC has 180 days from the date the charge is filed to complete this process, after which (if neither of those courses is taken) they must provide a “right-to-sue” notice to the complainant. Once a complainant receives a right to sue notice, they may then pursue a civil action against their employer on their own behalf.